The School Spirit


The School Spirit was published by the KI School in the 1960s. We are still working on these, so the index is pretty brief in some areas.







September 1962 - 1878 History of the old John Lange (Sr.) house at the west end of Titus Road, built in 1878 now owned by Wm Minshall Sr. 

November 1962 - Hunting season for pheasants started November 15,By Kevin Kleba


January 1963 - Bob Keba has trapped 11 coons so far this winter.


March 1963 - Dear fellow Islanders - This came to me here in Florida today by courtesy of Mrs. Ruth Schnittker and what a pleasure it has given me.
     Theodore J. Deringer writes about the original 1-room building, he attended 75 years ago (1888).
     One Indian mound at the NE part of the Island yield raccoon jawbones as well as deer bones.  
     8-9-1884 Laurie Riedy writes - The largest red-striped snake ever caught was found on Kelleys Island.  It measures 49" and is now housed in the Philadelphia Zoological Gardens as is the largest Fox snake on record.  It is 5' 10½" and came from Kelleys Island. Two years ago we came up with the world record Hognose snake (46") which is now at the U. S. National Museum in Washington D. C. The record Water Snake, which came from our Island, is now at the Cleveland Museum of Natural History.  It measures 54."


April 1963 - 8-9-1884 As to rattlesnakes on the Island, I can tell you very little as I had but one experience…I was probably 12-13 years old.  My folks lived right near the West quarry on a little rise, now quarried away.  We had a cow which I drove to the 'North Woods' and home everyday along with 2 other cows belonging to a neighbor.  One morning as I was passing Grandma Lange's oat field, about midway between her house and the Lake, the cows suddenly became frightened and left the road.  This was unusual behavior so I investigated and here in the weeds was a large diamond back.  Knowing how deadly these snakes are, I determined to kill it, which I did.  It was 5' long, 6 or 7" around and had 13 buttons.  That was the only rattler I saw on the Island.  Theodore J. Deringer
Mr. Hugo Seeholzer relates how he killed a large Timber rattlesnake back around 1914.  He tells that the snake was seen in the cut leading form the North road (Titus Rd.) to the quarry area in the vicinity of the old village dumping ground that is now part of the Minshall estate.  It is almost at the exact spot where Bob Kleba has his bees.
     Mr. Seeholzer talked about its great size: "I held it up by its tail on a level with the brim of my cap and the snake's head was still setting on the ground.  It had only 8 rattles but some may have been lost."
     "Most Murphy also killed a rattler about that same year (1914) but it was a much smaller one than the one I killed.  This snake was found in an area along a quarry ridge SW of the old 'powder house.'"
     Dilapidated building E of school house mentioned.  In May issue notes it is to be torn down.  Whose?
     There are several items from the diary of George Bristol:  
Thursday January 21 (1864):  Great scare; lights of rebels seen.  Company ordered out at 3 PM.  However none came.  Scouts report none to be seen on Middle Island or Pelee.
Friday, January 22 - Went to West Bay, pickets called in.  No danger.


May 1863 - We are expecting the Memorial Day Parade to be every bit as impressive as last year, if not more so this year.  However, the parade wills tart at 1 PM instead of in the morning.  The reason for this is that the Lakeside-Marblehead band cannot get over hear until that time.  Kevin Klebe


September 1963 - A number of our readers have suggested that we make our paper an Island paper as well as a school paper.  We now call on you to help us do exactly that:  Do you have any public or private announcements you wish to make?  Have you something you wish to sell or buy?  Any public appeals you wish to make?  Any information of general interest you’d like to share with us?  Would you like to write an editorial for us?  
     Our School enrollment is 26 this year. The breakdown is as follows: There are 8 students in the first 4 grades taught by Miss Helen Boker/Baker, 11 in grades 5-8 taught by Mr. Boker, and 7 in high school taught by Mr. Killel, our executive head..  Enrollment facts and figures
1935 160 (23 were in Grade 1)
1940 128
1945 71
1950 61
1955 47
1960 26
     ISLAND NEWS  The Lake Erie Electric Co-op Inc. held a meeting on Sat, Sept 21 in the Town Hall in the Town Hall.  Some of the members wanted to try to bring legislation against the Co-op board of directors for having lent money to the Kelleys Island Economic Development commission.  The majority of the members voted to support the board of directors, and the meeting was adjourned.
     One of our Island landmarks is no longer a scenic attraction.  The old Eagle Nest near the E. Quarry fell from the tree during a severe storm in June.  This nest, however, has not been in use for a number of years.  One nest still remains and the Eagles have been around here all summer.


October 1963 - Our new furnace is working fine and with the stoker there no longer is a problem of banking the fire in the evenings and weekends.  The stoker is set, at present, to turn on every hour and runs for 3 minutes unless the thermostat calls for more heat.  The only problem that Mr. Seeholzer seems to be having with the new furnace is keeping the flues free of soot.  If this is not done it seems the flues, when sooty, cause a heavy drain on the coal in the stoker.
     MOUNDS – Most information as to when each mound was found, what was found in each, where such findings went to and other information about Island mounds is generally vague and, in some cases, questionable.
     Mr. Dwelle states that mound H (Marianne and Moneghan) was found about 1904 by Mr. Moysey.  A human skull was taken form the mound and later taken to Sandusky.  We talked with Mr. Boker about the mound at H and he tells us that this particular mound was discovered about 35 years before Mr. Moysey 'discovered' it.
     In 1870 Col. Charles Whittlesey opened only a part of the mound and took form it the under jaw of a wolf, bones of fishes, ducks, and other birds.
     The mound measures 46' by 60' and has never been complete explored.  Two years ago Mr. Boker dug a small hole into the mound and found the lower jaw of a raccoon, a deer vertebra and bones of fishes, birds, and human bone fragments.
Col. Whittlesey wrote an account of his findings as well as maps and drawings of the mound.  Mr. Boker says this information can be found in Tract 41, Western Reserve Historical Society, PP. 35, 36.
     This account includes the following additional information:  "On the land of Mr. Ward about a mile west of the mound (H on the map) is a partially destroyed work 40 feet across, consisting of a low bank of earth and limestones enclosing pits that ramble ancient cashes.  The road in front of his house (the large house on the north side of Ward Road, about 350 yards east of the school, passes through the enclosure (K on the map).  Near the burying round (our present cemetery) on the north-south road, about ½ mile west of these cashes, 2 human skeletons were found under a fallen slab of line rock."
Mr. Dwelle questions whether a mound at D (located at the head of Neuman's Dock at Gibbon's place) is really an Indian mound.  He thinks it might be the burial place of a sailor that was buried there many years ago.  Mr. Seeholzer and Mr. Boker do not agree.  Three skeletons (one of a child and 2 young adults, along with several stone tools, were uncovered not too many years ago when a water-line trench was dug through the area.
by Elizabeth Ann Kilko and Barbara Feyedelem (both 7)


Dec 1963 – Jan 1964 - The Kelleys Island Volunteer Fire Department held its annual community pot-luck at the Town Hall on January, 11th.  The Fire Dept, furnished the ham, turkey, and the refreshments, and the Islanders pitched in with the other necessities.  Dancing and a good social get-together was enjoyed by all.  In fact, there was enough food left to have another lunch the next afternoon at McCune’s, open to anyone who still had an appetite.
The Islanders decided that we need more social get-togethers during the winter months.  So, on Sat. Jan. 25 the Islanders again got together at the Town Hall.  It was to have been a muskrat dinner but the muskrats were postponed for 2 weeks, and sandwiches, pot-luck style, were served instead.  A record player is used on these occasions to furnish the dance music.
MAP OF WINE CELLERS


February, 1964 - In the old days many of the folks that lived near the shore hauled their water barrels in wheelbarrows as well as drays, in the summer, and on sleds in the winter.  Later on, windmills were erected along the shore and tanks were built from which water flowed into nearby homes.  
Jake Hayes article – saving the life of a twin………
Remember how kinds used to hide in the coffins he built?  Remember how Addison Kelley used to be called upon to perform surgical operations, set bones, lance boils and pull teeth?  That hear, 1860, Mr. Kelley was asked to help deliver a baby.  The mid-wife found that the case was beyond her experience because the mother couldn't deliver.  Remember what Mr. Kelley did when he knew that he didn't have the right kind of obstetrical instruments?  You're absolutely correct!  He and Charles Carpenter went down to Jake Hay's blacksmith shop where they forged a crude but efficient appliance.  With this rough instrument, and without the aid of anesthetic, they succeeded in saving the life of one of the twins and of the mother.
     Remember John McDonald, who was hired to begin the Island's present cemetery in 1854?  He was surely 'bawled out' for the carelessness of his work!  Remember what he said in reply?  "I do not care!  I don't expect to be buried here anyhow!"  Well, it so happened, that in January 1854, while working in Wm. S. Webb's quarry, that McDonald was accidentally killed.  Guess who was the first person to be buried in that cemetery.
Remember the good old days when water, for home use, had to be hauled in barrels with horse and dray---just go down to the lake and start bucketing---unless you were fortunate enough to have a well.  Of course, in the wintertime you had to go chop a hole in the ice at a convenient place.  The hole froze over on cold nights and the man who got the first bucket of water next day, often had to chop out ice 3 or 4" thick.  Anyhow, remember Norman Kelley?  Well, Mr. Kelley in had a workman whom he employed in his quarry.  One of the daily tasks this man had to do besides work in the quarry was to supply water for the Kelley's domestic use.  His home was close to the shore.  This man must have arrived on the Island after the ice had formed for he was shown how to go down to the shore and out on the ice about 15 feet to a hole that had been chopped there to get the water out.  He dipped it through this hole every morning, filling a barrel which he brought on a sled and took the barrel of water to Mr. Kelley's house.  When Spring came, the ice had moved out, leaving the shore clear of ice.  The man went to the shore as usual, but returned after awhile without water.  On being asked the reason, he replied in broken English that he couldn't get any water because the water hole had gone away!
6-29-1924 – big storm, Kelley saved lives keeping people in office bldg in Sandusky.

March 1964 - Diary of Jerry Dean mentioned 1871
An anecdote is told of Edmund Ward who was returning from Sandusky on the Golden Eagle, an ice crushers, with several Islanders.  Some of his fellow passengers complained because the fare was too high, $1.00 each way.  In the summer the fare used to be 25c or 40c round trip between Sandusky and KI.  Mr. Ward listened quietly to the complaints and then he said in his quiet way, "By mighty, if you fellows had to walk across the ice with the mail boat, you would have paid a dollar and pulled the boat, and perhaps broke through and gotten wet half a dozen times.  It's much more comfortable on this boat at the same price."  This quieted the grumblers.


April 1964 - During the past couple weeks we have been corresponding with a very learned Indian, Lightfoot Talking Eagle, who lives in Tamaqua, Pennsylvania.
     Although we feel that what he has to say will be of great interest to you, space does not allow us to publish his letters in their entirety.
    May 4, 1984 – Dear Mr. Boker: Those who claim that the petroglypths were carved by the Moh-hee-kah-nee (Mound Builders) are correct.  Those who claim that the Moh-hee-kah-nee are an extinct race are walking in great darkness.  They are not 'Red Men.'  They are the primordial Ancients of Ancients of this Continent.  They were the first of the human race on this Continent. 
These are the Spirit Talking People.  They speak the "Ash-she-ooh-guh" language, the Language of Earth and Sky.  They have been incorrectly called "Susquehannocks, "Susquehannas," and by more than 50 other applicable but not strictly correct names.  They call themselves the "Kwaah-tah-hah-mah's."  Many of them now live among other American Indian people and races.  I think that most, however, would be found living on this Continent in non-Indian communities and thought to be non-Indians to most of their neighbors and acquaintances.  Only to their mot intimate friends are they known for their heritage of being able to commune with the Supreme Spirit and angels, archangels, and the spirits of departed mortals.
The petroglyphs on Kelleys Island Inscription Rock, that is most of them, can be readily 'read.'  However, due to effacing and defacing by the elements, time and man, some require further close study before correct interpretations can be given them.
The inscription refers to a large mound – a Sacred Ceremonial Mound.  Do you know where it is located?  The so-called 'division' lines evidently refer to the 'Paths' or doors and passageways within the mound or pyramid.  The moon is at the apex of the Mound.  This Sacred Spiritual Ceremonial was held when the Moon was in its second phase or First Quarter.  The Mound Builders and the Giant Race of Beings that once lived here worshipped together in the mound.  The Giant Beings were known as the Uyh-gush-guh.  They are referred to in Genesis 6:2 & 3.  The Giant Beings were Spirits.  They returned to home in the Sky Garden when the invaders from across the saltwaters came to the Holy and Sacred Land.  The Yuh-gush-guh will only take up their habitation where the people follow and observe the Great Spirit's Law of Peace and Brotherhood.  The 'Capital' City of the Giant Beings weas known as "Yuh-guh-guh-unn-dah."  The descendents of the Moh-hee-kah-nee know its general location.

May 1964 - SCHOOL NEWS – the commencement program for the Kelleys Island Local School will be held in the Town Hall on Saturday, May 30 at 8:00 p.m.  Donald Wolfe, assistant managing editor of the Toledo Blade, will give the address “Invest Now.”  Sharon Kleba will be our one and only graduate.  Lizabeth Martin will be our only 8th grader to receive the promotion to high school certificate.  Other awards will be presented.
Lydia Rydall 1913 Sketches and stories – pound fishing

Sept. 1964, Vol. 3, No. 1 - Students-Tim Kilko, Brenda Matso, Debbie Seeholzer, Sandy Holmes, Nancy Riedy, Pamela Routly, Joel Feyedelem, Monte Betzenheimer, Lu Ann Pohorence, Jimmy Holmes, Alice Feyedelem, Linda Routly, Geri Riedy, Gwendolyn Routly, Al Goudreau, Richard Holmes, Mark Betzenheimer, John Kilko, Kathy Kilko, Bradley Pohorence, Barbara Knapp, Alice Feyedelem, Sally Riedy, Barbara Feyedelem, Elizabeth Ann Kilko, Marcie Riedy, Laurie Riedy, Michael Feyedelem, Ned Perruchon, Don Miller, Jim Bugel. Included are reports from each grade, cub scout news, girl scout news (troupe 240), Centennial of the scuttling of the Island Queen steamboat. Island news: Theo. Morris showed home movies of trip around the world, Quarry to start up under name of Kellstone Quarry Inc. a new extension on Neuman’s Boat Dock, Mrs. Esther Sennish is visiting her mother, Jack Sennish is only commercial fisherman with nets in the lake, Letter from Jack Schock, stated at Fort Sill, OK. Gertrude McGlinchey is married in the Catholic church, daughter of August Mahr. Geraldine Erne and Lawrence Betzenheimer were married on Sept. 29 in Sandusky.


Oct-Nov 1964, Vol. 3, No. 2 - Editorial Staff: Barbara Feyedelem, John Kilko, Alice Feyedelem, Linda Routly, Geri Riedy, Richard Holmes, Alice Feyedelem, Bradley Pohorence, Mark Betzenheimer, Katherine Kilko, Barbara Knapp, Gwendolyn Routly, Al Goudreau, Elizabeth Ann Kilko. Contains school news by grade, Island News (mentioned are Roland Brown, Mrs. Adam Bianchi, Lawrence Betzenheimer, McCune’s dining room, Ned Perruchon, Metro Kilko’s airplane, progress on Neuman’s dock, Jack Schock married Barbara Pawlowski, Godfried Schock, Quarry crusher is going up fast, Don Erne, John Bugel, plane crash, pheasant hunting. Council News, purchase of airport property, campsite to be enlarged. PTA to sponsor Christmas potluck. Girl and Cub scout news. History of Glaciers. School Students will present the operetta “He Said He Was Santa.”


December 1964, Vol. 3, No. 3 – Editorial Staff: Barbara Feyedelem, John Kilko, Alice Feyedelem, Linda Routly, Richard Holmes, Bradley Pohorence, Mark Betzenheimer, Katherine Kilko, Barbara Knapp, Gwendolyn Routly, Al Goudreau. Subscriptions Elizabeth Ann Kilko.  Paper published monthly by the students of grades 5, 6, 7, and 8 of the Kelleys Island Local School. Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts mentioned. Island News: Freighter J. B. John attempted to deliver sand to west dock, low water.  Jack Holmes aged 21 died; parents M/M Raymond Holmes. Body of Wayne Davidson found on the beach on south side. Was pilot of the Cessna which crashed into Lake Erie a month ago. Found by Chuck Riedy, David Brown and Ned Perruchon. Annual Christmas party held in Kelley’s Hall. Clifford Brown taken to hospital. Mr. Van Wagoner died Nov. 28. A roaring Twenties party will be held at Kelley’s Hall on Jan 9, 1965, sponsored by the Volunteer Fire Dept.
February 1965, Vol. 3, No. 4 – Editorial Staff: Barbara Feyedelem, Mark Betzenheimer, Linda Routly, Richard Holmes, Alice Feyedelem, Bradley Pohorence, Subscriptions Elizabeth Ann Kilko.  Paper published monthly by the students of grades 5, 6, 7, and 8 of the Kelleys Island Local School. Girl Scout and Boy Scout news. The new crusher and conveyor system installed last fall was tested on February 15, about 75 tons of rock was put through. Blasting has started. Mrs. John Bugle home from the hospital. Clifford Brown is also home. Mr. Chucta and John Naylor passed away. Nelson Dwelle celebrated his 85th birthday. The Jolly Boys went to Put-in-Bay to play a basketball game. Ice fishing shanties are up on the west and north sides of the island. Henry Beatty was elected President of Council, Hugo Seeholzer resigned his council seat and Donald Routly replaced him. A summary of 10 sunken boats and a map of their location appears, thanks to Frank E. Hamilton. Discussion on whether we should have a Historical Society.
March 1965, Vol. 3, No. 5 – Editorial Staff: Barbara Feyedelem, Mark Betzenheimer, Al Goudreau, Linda Routly, Richard Holmes, Alice Feyedelem, Bradley Pohorence, Barbara Knapp. Subscriptions Elizabeth Ann Kilko.  Paper published monthly by the students of grades 5, 6, 7, and 8 of the Kelleys Island Local School. Girl Scout and Cub Scout news. Chuck Riedy (class of 63) is on honor roll at Lorain Co. Community College. Billy Perruchon (1961) is stationed at Fort Knox and is now a private. Micky Riedy (1962) is employed at Erie Co. Mrs. William Horn died. Fire Dept. officers: Ronald Beaqtty, Nick Bianchi, Ronald Beatty, Harvey Einhart, James Seeholzer. The Ladies Auxiliary held their annual Anniversary Dinner at Vi Haig’s restaurant. Members present: Mrs. James Seeholzer, Mrs. Franklin, Phohorence, Mrs. Peter Kekelik, Mrs. Tiola Riedy, Mrs. Josephy Feyedelem, Mrs. Leonard Knapp, Mrs. William Perruchon, Miss Mary Marchky, Mrs. Maude Hamilton, Mrs. George Yoscowitz, Rev. Gilbert Stopko, and Rev. Joseph Ehrbar. Historical tidbits: First white child born on the Island was George Ellithorpe on October 6, 1832 to Henry & Elizabeth Ellithorpe. First school teacher was Miss Lucretia Wood-1836. First school house was erected in 1837 and taught by Miss M. H. Dean. In 1850 School District No. 2 was established on the east end, on Woodford Road, not far from what was then J. Woodford’s farm. The two story stone school was erected in 1853. District No. 1 teacher was William Hull in 1862. In 1877 a frame high school was erected on Division St. In 1901 Estes School was erected by James Estes.
April 1965, Vol. 3, No. 6 – Editorial Staff: Barbara Feyedelem, Mark Betzenheimer, Al Goudreau, Linda Routly, Richard Holmes, Alice Feyedelem, Bradley Pohorence, Barbara Knapp. Subscriptions Elizabeth Kilko.  Paper published monthly by the students of grades 5, 6, 7, and 8 of the Kelleys Island Local School. Girl Scout and Cub Scout news. Iola Riedy talked to high school about Dewey Decimal System and how to locate books. Island News: Kelley s Island Volunteer Fire Dept. to use old truck and burned an old house which was pulled down just east of the school. It was on State property. Just when fire got going, snow started falling and they gave up. The Madonna Ladies Auxiliary held its monthly meeting at Iola Riedy home. At the PTA meeting the Girl Scouts put on a program of songs and dance and refreshments were served by Mrs. Edward Gioudreau and Mrs. Leonard Knapp. The PIB basketball team came to Kelleys Island on the Ford tri-motor plane. Lewis F. Laylen passed on March 14, lived on east shore. John Hughes, at age 92, slipped and fell, broke hip. Taken to Good Samaritan Hospital by Sky Tours Inc. Mrs. Susan Semansen taken to Providence Hospital. Rev. Gilbert Stopko, pastor of St. Michael’s Church was in hospital, and Clifford Brown returns from hospital. Bill (Hops) Perruchon returned to the Island recovering from bronchial pneumonia. Kitchen fire at Allen Brian’s home, extinguished by Volunteer Fire Dept. The new Jeep tank-truck (1 year old) was on its way to the fire with a tank of water, while the fire engine was coming from the fire to fill up again with a load of water. While trying to pass on a narrow place along Ward Rd., the tank-truck went off the road, hit a stump, flew into the air and landed in a field. The weight of the tank of water kept the truck from overturning. Considerable damage to the underside though. Appalachia Food and Clothing Drive organized by Mrs. Mary Trumpower, Mrs. August Mahr, Mrs. William Perruchon and Mrs. R. Holmes. The WSWS had monthly meeting at the Community Church. Mrs. Mamie Brown-leader and Mrs. Charles Schnittker-hostess. Sewing Club meets every Sunday night at Mrs. Russell Matso house. For 8.5 years, Mrs. Godfried Schock has been assistant postmaster on KI. She has resigned and Mrs. Elizabeth Martin takes her place. New Baby for Mike Bell family. Mrs. Bell is the former Sharon Kleba (class of ’64). Village to repair Doctor’s House. History of Limestone Quarrying on Kelleys Island. Excerpts from Nichol’s Handy Guide Book to PIB, Middle Bass and Kelleys Island, published in 1888: Glacial Grooves. KI Historical Society survey had few responses, but generally in favor.
June 1965, Vol. 3, No. 7 – Editorial Staff: Barbara Feyedelem, Mark Betzenheimer, Al Goudreau, Linda Routly, Richard Holmes, Alice Feyedelem, Bradley Pohorence, Barbara Knapp. Subscriptions Elizabeth Kilko.  Paper published monthly by the students of grades 5, 6, 7, and 8 of the Kelleys Island Local School. Girl Scout and Cub Scout news. Last issue of the year. Island News: Madonna Ladies Auxiliary met at Leonard Knapp house and later at Mary Marchky’s house The Rosary-Alter Society of St. Michael’s Church enrolled a new  member. Rev. Gilbert Stopko (corrected to Joseph Ehrbar) presiding. Meeting at Vi Haig’s restaurant. WSWS meeting lead by Mrs. Francis Betzenheimer with hostel Mrs. Oscar McKillips. M/M Charles Schnittker, Rev. & Mrs. Walton, Roy Fenwick, Elizabeth Kilko and Kathy Kilko attended a wedding and anniversary in Sandusky. Mr. Boker showed old pictures at the PTA meeting. Junior and Senior class talked about their class trip to New York and the World’s Fair. Kellstone added a 26-28 ton bulldozer to their equipment and hired Jim Kekelik, Bob Erne and Jim McAfee. Drilling and blasting going on daily. Henry Beatty and Carl Seeholzer work for the state to get campground ready. John Hughes died, was oldest living person on the island and is remembered. Daughter is Mrs. Oscar McKillips and son is Clayton Hughes. James McGlinchey (son-in-law of August Mahr) had to land his plane without a landing gear. Burt Miller granted permission to erect a miniature golf course downtown. History of the Quarry continues and there are 9 photos with descriptions along with 2 maps.
o. 2, Nos. 4, 5

- 1888 - Dear fellow Islanders - This came to me here in Florida today by courtesy of Mrs. Ruth Schnittker and what a pleasure it has given me.
     Theodore J. Deringer writes about the original 1-room building, he attended 75 years ago.
      One Indian mound at the NE part of the Island yield raccoon jawbones as well as deer bones. 
       8-9-1884, Laurie Riedy writes - The largest red-striped snake ever caught was found on Kelleys Island.  It measures 49" and is now housed in the Philadelphia Zoological Gardens as is the largest Fox snake on record.  It is 5' 10½" and came from Kelleys Island. Two years ago we came up with the world record Hognose snake (46") which is now at the U. S. National Museum in Washington D. C. The record Water Snake, which came from our Island, is now at the Cleveland Museum of Natural History.  It measures 54."

April 1963 - 8-9-1884, As to rattlesnakes on the Island, I can tell you very little as I had but one experience…I was probably 12-13 years old.  My folks lived right near the West quarry on a little rise, now quarried away.  We had a cow which I drove to the 'North Woods' and home everyday along with 2 other cows belonging to a neighbor.  One morning as I was passing Grandma Lange's oat field, about midway between her house and the Lake, the cows suddenly became frightened and left the road.  This was unusual behavior so I investigated and here in the weeds was a large diamond back.  Knowing how deadly these snakes are, I determined to kill it, which I did.  It was 5' long, 6 or 7" around and had 13 buttons.  That was the only rattler I saw on the Island.  Theodore J. Deringer
       Mr. Hugo Seeholzer relates how he killed a large Timber rattlesnake back around 1914.  He tells that the snake was seen in the cut leading form the North road (Titus Rd.) to the quarry area in the vicinity of the old village dumping ground that is now part of the Minshall estate.  It is almost at the exact spot where Bob Kleba has his bees.
     Mr. Seeholzer talked about its great size: "I held it up by its tail on a level with the brim of my cap and the snake's head was still setting on the ground.  It had only 8 rattles but some may have been lost."
     "Most Murphy also killed a rattler about that same year (1914) but it was a much smaller one than the one I killed.  This snake was found in an area along a quarry ridge SW of the old 'powder house.'"
       Dilapidated building E of school house mentioned.  In May issue notes it is to be torn down.  Whose?
     There are several items from the diary of George Bristol: Thursday January 21 (1864):  Great scare; lights of rebels seen.  Company ordered out at 3 PM.  However none came.  Scouts report none to be seen on Middle Island or Pelee.
     Friday, January 22 - Went to West Bay, pickets called in.  No danger.

May 1863 - We are expecting the Memorial Day Parade to be every bit as impressive as last year, if not more so this year.  However, the parade wills tart at 1 PM instead of in the morning.  The reason for this is that the Lakeside-Marblehead band cannot get over hear until that time.  Kevin Klebe

September 1963 - Dear Readers, Another school year is well under way and we are looking forward to exciting days ahead!  We are happy to present Vol. 2 of the “School Spirit” which we hope you will enjoy.  The encouragement and support which we have received during the past year, in regard to our paper is gratifying.  It is our hope that we can success in making this year’s volume an even better paper for, surely, there is always room for improvement.  Again we will need your help. 
     A number of our readers have suggested that we make our paper an Island paper as well as a school paper.  We now call on you to help us do exactly that:  Do you have any public or private announcements you wish to make?  Have you something you wish to sell or buy?  Any public appeals you wish to make?  Any information of general interest you’d like to share with us?  Would you like to write an editorial for us? 
     This is your paper and we want you to be a part of it….The number of subscriptions to our paper this school year has almost doubled that of last year.  We are also happy to report that our paper is finding its way into states other than Ohio.  These include Indiana, Michigan, Illinois, Pennsylvania, New York, Maryland, North Carolina, and California.  In fact, our paper is also finding its way across the Atlantic to Switzerland.  All of this, of course, spurns us towards a higher goal in making improvements on our paper.  However, we are faced with a situation we had not prepared for. Almost one half of our total number of subscribers don’t live on the Island.  This means that, since we have not asked our subscribers to pay for their own mailing, over $20.00 of our subscription receipts will be required during the school year to pay for postage. 
     We know that you can easily understand that of what we pay a total mailing cost of 5 cents per copy (4 cents for postage plus 1 cent for envelope) added to the cost of the paper, fluid, and other items necessary to publish the school paper there remains only a small margin of profit.  We cannot get any special rates for mailing our paper.  Next year it will be necessary to request that our out-of-town subscribers pay their own mailing costs.  In order to help a little in whittling down that $20.00 figure we are asking that if anyone wishes to buy extra copies of our school paper the price will be 15 cents per single copy instead of the 10 cents we asked last year.  Also, if extra copies are to be mailed, we’d like to ask you to include the cost of the mailing. 
     We are looking for equipment which is more adequate to take care of our needs in publishing our paper.  At present we are using a simple portable spirit duplicator.  This involves a slow and tedious process.  Two stencils need to be made for each page of our paper and each sheet of paper is rolled off by hand (that is, only one sheet at a time can be placed in the machine).  Print is sometimes, if not often, a little difficult to read.
     Until we can obtain a better type of machine we hope you will be patient with us.  We hope you enjoy our paper!      The Staff
     Our total enrollment is 26 this year. The breakdown is as follows: There are 8 students in the first 4 grades taught by Miss Helen Boker/Baker, 11 in grades 5-8 taught by Mr. Boker, and 7 in high school taught by Mr. Killel, our executive head.
     ISLAND NEWS  The Lake Erie Electric Co-op Inc. held a meeting on Sat, Sept 21 in the Town Hall in the Town Hall.  Some of the members wanted to try to bring legislation against the Co-op board of directors for having lent money to the Kelleys Island Economic Development commission.  The majority of the members voted to support the board of directors, and the meeting was adjourned.
     One of our Island landmarks is no longer a scenic attraction.  The old Eagle Nest near the E. Quarry fell from the tree during a severe storm in June.  This nest, however, has not been in use for a number of years.  One nest still remains and the Eagles have been around here all summer.

October 1963 -  Our new furnace is working fine and with the stoker there no longer is a problem of banking the fire in the evenings and weekends.  The stoker is set, at present, to turn on every hour and runs for 3 minutes unless the thermostat calls for more heat.  The only problem that Mr. Seeholzer seems to be having with the new furnace is keeping the flues free of soot.  If this is not done it seems the flues, when sooty, cause a heavy drain on the coal in the stoker.
      MOUNDS – Most information as to when each mound was found, what was found in each, where such findings went to and other information about Island mounds is generally vague and, in some cases, questionable.
     Mr. Dwelle states that mound H (Marianne and Moneghan) was found about 1904 by Mr. Moysey.  A human skull was taken form the mound and later taken to Sandusky.  We talked with Mr. Boker about the mound at H and he tells us that this particular mound was discovered about 35 years before Mr. Moysey 'discovered' it.
     In 1870 Col. Charles Whittlesey opened only a part of the mound and took form it the under jaw of a wolf, bones of fishes, ducks, and other birds.
     The mound measures 46' by 60' and has never been complete explored.  Two years ago Mr. Boker dug a small hole into the mound and found the lower jaw of a raccoon, a deer vertebra and bones of fishes, birds, and human bone fragments.
      Col. Whittlesey wrote an account of his findings as well as maps and drawings of the mound.  Mr. Boker says this information can be found in Tract 41, Western Reserve Historical Society, PP. 35, 36.
      This account includes the following additional information:  "On the land of Mr. Ward about a mile west of the mound (H on the map) is a partially destroyed work 40 feet across, consisting of a low bank of earth and limestones enclosing pits that ramble ancient cashes.  The road in front of his house (the large house on the north side of Ward Road, about 350 yards east of the school, passes through the enclosure (K on the map).  Near the burying round (our present cemetery) on the north-south road, about ½ mile west of these cashes, 2 human skeletons were found under a fallen slab of line rock."
     Mr. Dwelle questions whether a mound at D (located at the head of Neuman's Dock at Gibbon's place) is really an Indian mound.  He thinks it might be the burial place of a sailor that was buried there many years ago.  Mr. Seeholzer and Mr. Boker do not agree.  Three skeletons (one of a child and 2 young adults, along with several stone tools, were uncovered not too many years ago when a water-line trench was dug through the area. by Elizabeth Ann Kilko and Barbara Feyedelem (both 7)

Dec 1963 – Jan 1964 - The Kelleys Island Volunteer Fire Department held its annual community pot-luck at the Town Hall on January, 11th.  The Fire Dept, furnished the ham, turkey, and the refreshments, and the Islanders pitched in with the other necessities.  Dancing and a good social get-together was enjoyed by all.  In fact, there was enough food left to have another lunch the next afternoon at McCune’s, open to anyone who still had an appetite.
     The Islanders decided that we need more social get-togethers during the winter months.  So, on Sat. Jan. 25 the Islanders again got together at the Town Hall.  It was to have been a muskrat dinner but the muskrats were postponed for 2 weeks, and sandwiches, pot-luck style, were served instead.  A record player is used on these occasions to furnish the dance music.
     MAP OF WINE CELLERS

February, 1964 - In the old days many of the folks that lived near the shore hauled their water barrels in wheelbarrows as well as drays, in the summer, and on sleds in the winter.  Later on, windmills were erected along the shore and tanks were built from which water flowed into nearby homes. 
     Jake Hayes article – saving the life of a twin………
     Remember how kids used to hide in the coffins he built?  Remember how Addison Kelley used to be called upon to perform surgical operations, set bones, lance boils and pull teeth?  That year, 1860, Mr. Kelley was asked to help deliver a baby.  The mid-wife found that the case was beyond her experience because the mother couldn't deliver.  Remember what Mr. Kelley did when he knew that he didn't have the right kind of obstetrical instruments?  You're absolutely correct!  He and Charles Carpenter went down to Jake Hay's blacksmith shop where they forged a crude but efficient appliance.  With this rough instrument, and without the aid of anesthetic, they succeeded in saving the life of one of the twins and of the mother.
     Remember John McDonald, who was hired to begin the Island's present cemetery in 1854?  He was surely 'bawled out' for the carelessness of his work!  Remember what he said in reply?  "I do not care!  I don't expect to be buried here anyhow!"  Well, it so happened, that in January 1854, while working in Wm. S. Webb's quarry, that McDonald was accidentally killed.  Guess who was the first person to be buried in that cemetery.
     Remember the good old days when water, for home use, had to be hauled in barrels with horse and dray---just go down to the lake and start bucketing---unless you were fortunate enough to have a well.  Of course, in the wintertime you had to go chop a hole in the ice at a convenient place.  The hole froze over on cold nights and the man who got the first bucket of water next day, often had to chop out ice 3 or 4" thick.  Anyhow, remember Norman Kelley?  Well, Mr. Kelley in had a workman whom he employed in his quarry.  One of the daily tasks this man had to do besides work in the quarry was to supply water for the Kelley's domestic use.  His home was close to the shore.  This man must have arrived on the Island after the ice had formed for he was shown how to go down to the shore and out on the ice about 15 feet to a hole that had been chopped there to get the water out.  He dipped it through this hole every morning, filling a barrel which he brought on a sled and took the barrel of water to Mr. Kelley's house.  When Spring came, the ice had moved out, leaving the shore clear of ice.  The man went to the shore as usual, but returned after awhile without water.  On being asked the reason, he replied in broken English that he couldn't get any water because the water hole had gone away!
      6-29-1924 – big storm, Kelley saved lives keeping people in office bldg in Sandusky.

March 1964 - Diary of Jerry Dean mentioned 1871. An anecdote is told of Edmund Ward who was returning from Sandusky on the Golden Eagle, an ice crushers, with several Islanders.  Some of his fellow passengers complained because the fare was too high, $1.00 each way.  In the summer the fare used to be 25c or 40c round trip between Sandusky and KI.  Mr. Ward listened quietly to the complaints and then he said in his quiet way, "By mighty, if you fellows had to walk across the ice with the mail boat, you would have paid a dollar and pulled the boat, and perhaps broke through and gotten wet half a dozen times.  It's much more comfortable on this boat at the same price."  This quieted the grumblers.

April 1964 -  During the past couple weeks we have been corresponding with a very learned Indian, Lightfoot Talking Eagle, who lives in Tamaqua, Pennsylvania.
     Although we feel that what he has to say will be of great interest to you, space does not allow us to publish his letters in their entirety.

May 4, 1984 – Dear Mr. Boker: Those who claim that the petroglypths were carved by the Moh-hee-kah-nee (Mound Builders) are correct.  Those who claim that the Moh-hee-kah-nee are an extinct race are walking in great darkness.  They are not 'Red Men.'  They are the primordial Ancients of Ancients of this Continent.  They were the first of the human race on this Continent.
     These are the Spirit Talking People.  They speak the "Ash-she-ooh-guh" language, the Language of Earth and Sky.  They have been incorrectly called "Susquehannocks, "Susquehannas," and by more than 50 other applicable but not strictly correct names.  They call themselves the "Kwaah-tah-hah-mah's."  Many of them now live among other American Indian people and races.  I think that most, however, would be found living on this Continent in non-Indian communities and thought to be non-Indians to most of their neighbors and acquaintances.  Only to their mot intimate friends are they known for their heritage of being able to commune with the Supreme Spirit and angels, archangels, and the spirits of departed mortals.
     The petroglyphs on Kelleys Island Inscription Rock, that is most of them, can be readily 'read.'  However, due to effacing and defacing by the elements, time and man, some require further close study before correct interpretations can be given them.
     The inscription refers to a large mound – a Sacred Ceremonial Mound.  Do you know where it is located?  The so-called 'division' lines evidently refer to the 'Paths' or doors and passageways within the mound or pyramid.  The moon is at the apex of the Mound.  This Sacred Spiritual Ceremonial was held when the Moon was in its second phase or First Quarter.  The Mound Builders and the Giant Race of Beings that once lived here worshipped together in the mound.  The Giant Beings were known as the Uyh-gush-guh.  They are referred to in Genesis 6:2 & 3.  The Giant Beings were Spirits.  They returned to home in the Sky Garden when the invaders from across the saltwaters came to the Holy and Sacred Land.  The Yuh-gush-guh will only take up their habitation where the people follow and observe the Great Spirit's Law of Peace and Brotherhood.  The 'Capital' City of the Giant Beings was known as "Yuh-guh-guh-unn-dah."  The descendents of the Moh-hee-kah-nee know its general location.

May 1964 - SCHOOL NEWS – the commencement program for the Kelleys Island Local School will be held in the Town Hall on Saturday, May 30 at 8:00 p.m.  Donald Wolfe, assistant managing editor of the Toledo Blade, will give the address “Invest Now.”  Sharon Kleba will be our one and only graduate.  Lizabeth Martin will be our only 8th grader to receive the promotion to high school certificate.  Other awards will be presented.
     Lydia Rydall 1913 Sketches and stories – pound fishing

Sept. 1964, Vol. 3, No. 1 - Students-Tim Kilko, Brenda Matso, Debbie Seeholzer, Sandy Holmes, Nancy Riedy, Pamela Routly, Joel Feyedelem, Monte Betzenheimer, Lu Ann Pohorence, Jimmy Holmes, Alice Feyedelem, Linda Routly, Geri Riedy, Gwendolyn Routly, Al Goudreau, Richard Holmes, Mark Betzenheimer, John Kilko, Kathy Kilko, Bradley Pohorence, Barbara Knapp, Alice Feyedelem, Sally Riedy, Barbara Feyedelem, Elizabeth Ann Kilko, Marcie Riedy, Laurie Riedy, Michael Feyedelem, Ned Perruchon, Don Miller, Jim Bugel. Included are reports from each grade, cub scout news, girl scout news (troupe 240), Centennial of the scuttling of the Island Queen steamboat. Island news: Theo. Morris showed home movies of trip around the world, Quarry to start up under name of Kellstone Quarry Inc. a new extension on Neuman’s Boat Dock, Mrs. Esther Sennish is visiting her mother, Jack Sennish is only commercial fisherman with nets in the lake, Letter from Jack Schock, stated at Fort Sill, OK. Gertrude McGlinchey is married in the Catholic church, daughter of August Mahr. Geraldine Erne and Lawrence Betzenheimer were married on Sept. 29 in Sandusky.

Oct-Nov 1964, Vol. 3, No. 2 - Editorial Staff: Barbara Feyedelem, John Kilko, Alice Feyedelem, Linda Routly, Geri Riedy, Richard Holmes, Alice Feyedelem, Bradley Pohorence, Mark Betzenheimer, Katherine Kilko, Barbara Knapp, Gwendolyn Routly, Al Goudreau, Elizabeth Ann Kilko. Contains school news by grade, Island News (mentioned are Roland Brown, Mrs. Adam Bianchi, Lawrence Betzenheimer, McCune’s dining room, Ned Perruchon, Metro Kilko’s airplane, progress on Neuman’s dock, Jack Schock married Barbara Pawlowski, Godfried Schock, Quarry crusher is going up fast, Don Erne, John Bugel, plane crash, pheasant hunting. Council News, purchase of airport property, campsite to be enlarged. PTA to sponsor Christmas potluck. Girl and Cub scout news. History of Glaciers. School Students will present the operetta “He Said He Was Santa.” 

December 1964, Vol. 3, No. 3 – Editorial Staff: Barbara Feyedelem, John Kilko, Alice Feyedelem, Linda Routly, Richard Holmes, Bradley Pohorence, Mark Betzenheimer, Katherine Kilko, Barbara Knapp, Gwendolyn Routly, Al Goudreau. Subscriptions Elizabeth Ann Kilko.  Paper published monthly by the students of grades 5, 6, 7, and 8 of the Kelleys Island Local School. Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts mentioned. Island News: Freighter J. B. John attempted to deliver sand to west dock, low water.  Jack Holmes aged 21 died; parents M/M Raymond Holmes. Body of Wayne Davidson found on the beach on south side. Was pilot of the Cessna which crashed into Lake Erie a month ago. Found by Chuck Riedy, David Brown and Ned Perruchon. Annual Christmas party held in Kelley’s Hall. Clifford Brown taken to hospital. Mr. Van Wagoner died Nov. 28. A roaring Twenties party will be held at Kelley’s Hall on Jan 9, 1965, sponsored by the Volunteer Fire Dept.

February 1965, Vol. 3, No. 4 – Editorial Staff: Barbara Feyedelem, Mark Betzenheimer, Linda Routly, Richard Holmes, Alice Feyedelem, Bradley Pohorence, Subscriptions Elizabeth Ann Kilko.  Paper published monthly by the students of grades 5, 6, 7, and 8 of the Kelleys Island Local School. Girl Scout and Boy Scout news. The new crusher and conveyor system installed last fall was tested on February 15, about 75 tons of rock was put through. Blasting has started. Mrs. John Bugle home from the hospital. Clifford Brown is also home. Mr. Chucta and John Naylor passed away. Nelson Dwelle celebrated his 85th birthday. The Jolly Boys went to Put-in-Bay to play a basketball game. Ice fishing shanties are up on the west and north sides of the island. Henry Beatty was elected President of Council, Hugo Seeholzer resigned his council seat and Donald Routly replaced him. A summary of 10 sunken boats and a map of their location appears, thanks to Frank E. Hamilton. Discussion on whether we should have a Historical Society.

March 1965, Vol. 3, No. 5 – Editorial Staff: Barbara Feyedelem, Mark Betzenheimer, Al Goudreau, Linda Routly, Richard Holmes, Alice Feyedelem, Bradley Pohorence, Barbara Knapp. Subscriptions Elizabeth Ann Kilko.  Paper published monthly by the students of grades 5, 6, 7, and 8 of the Kelleys Island Local School. Girl Scout and Cub Scout news. Chuck Riedy (class of 63) is on honor roll at Lorain Co. Community College. Billy Perruchon (1961) is stationed at Fort Knox and is now a private. Micky Riedy (1962) is employed at Erie Co. Mrs. William Horn died. Fire Dept. officers: Ronald Beaqtty, Nick Bianchi, Ronald Beatty, Harvey Einhart, James Seeholzer. The Ladies Auxiliary held their annual Anniversary Dinner at Vi Haig’s restaurant. Members present: Mrs. James Seeholzer, Mrs. Franklin, Phohorence, Mrs. Peter Kekelik, Mrs. Tiola Riedy, Mrs. Josephy Feyedelem, Mrs. Leonard Knapp, Mrs. William Perruchon, Miss Mary Marchky, Mrs. Maude Hamilton, Mrs. George Yoscowitz, Rev. Gilbert Stopko, and Rev. Joseph Ehrbar. Historical tidbits: First white child born on the Island was George Ellithorpe on October 6, 1832 to Henry & Elizabeth Ellithorpe. First school teacher was Miss Lucretia Wood-1836. First school house was erected in 1837 and taught by Miss M. H. Dean. In 1850 School District No. 2 was established on the east end, on Woodford Road, not far from what was then J. Woodford’s farm. The two story stone school was erected in 1853. District No. 1 teacher was William Hull in 1862. In 1877 a frame high school was erected on Division St. In 1901 Estes School was erected by James Estes.

April 1965, Vol. 3, No. 6 – Editorial Staff: Barbara Feyedelem, Mark Betzenheimer, Al Goudreau, Linda Routly, Richard Holmes, Alice Feyedelem, Bradley Pohorence, Barbara Knapp. Subscriptions Elizabeth Kilko.  Paper published monthly by the students of grades 5, 6, 7, and 8 of the Kelleys Island Local School. Girl Scout and Cub Scout news. Iola Riedy talked to high school about Dewey Decimal System and how to locate books. Island News: Kelley s Island Volunteer Fire Dept. to use old truck and burned an old house which was pulled down just east of the school. It was on State property. Just when fire got going, snow started falling and they gave up. The Madonna Ladies Auxiliary held its monthly meeting at Iola Riedy home. At the PTA meeting the Girl Scouts put on a program of songs and dance and refreshments were served by Mrs. Edward Gioudreau and Mrs. Leonard Knapp. The PIB basketball team came to Kelleys Island on the Ford tri-motor plane. Lewis F. Laylen passed on March 14, lived on east shore. John Hughes, at age 92, slipped and fell, broke hip. Taken to Good Samaritan Hospital by Sky Tours Inc. Mrs. Susan Semansen taken to Providence Hospital. Rev. Gilbert Stopko, pastor of St. Michael’s Church was in hospital, and Clifford Brown returns from hospital. Bill (Hops) Perruchon returned to the Island recovering from bronchial pneumonia. Kitchen fire at Allen Brian’s home, extinguished by Volunteer Fire Dept. The new Jeep tank-truck (1 year old) was on its way to the fire with a tank of water, while the fire engine was coming from the fire to fill up again with a load of water. While trying to pass on a narrow place along Ward Rd., the tank-truck went off the road, hit a stump, flew into the air and landed in a field. The weight of the tank of water kept the truck from overturning. Considerable damage to the underside though. Appalachia Food and Clothing Drive organized by Mrs. Mary Trumpower, Mrs. August Mahr, Mrs. William Perruchon and Mrs. R. Holmes. The WSWS had monthly meeting at the Community Church. Mrs. Mamie Brown-leader and Mrs. Charles Schnittker-hostess. Sewing Club meets every Sunday night at Mrs. Russell Matso house. For 8.5 years, Mrs. Godfried Schock has been assistant postmaster on KI. She has resigned and Mrs. Elizabeth Martin takes her place. New Baby for Mike Bell family. Mrs. Bell is the former Sharon Kleba (class of ’64). Village to repair Doctor’s House. History of Limestone Quarrying on Kelleys Island. Excerpts from Nichol’s Handy Guide Book to PIB, Middle Bass and Kelleys Island, published in 1888: Glacial Grooves. KI Historical Society survey had few responses, but generally in favor.

June 1965, Vol. 3, No. 7 – Editorial Staff: Barbara Feyedelem, Mark Betzenheimer, Al Goudreau, Linda Routly, Richard Holmes, Alice Feyedelem, Bradley Pohorence, Barbara Knapp. Subscriptions Elizabeth Kilko.  Paper published monthly by the students of grades 5, 6, 7, and 8 of the Kelleys Island Local School. Girl Scout and Cub Scout news. Last issue of the year. Island News: Madonna Ladies Auxiliary met at Leonard Knapp house and later at Mary Marchky’s house The Rosary-Alter Society of St. Michael’s Church enrolled a new  member. Rev. Gilbert Stopko (corrected to Joseph Ehrbar) presiding. Meeting at Vi Haig’s restaurant. WSWS meeting lead by Mrs. Francis Betzenheimer with hostel Mrs. Oscar McKillips. M/M Charles Schnittker, Rev. & Mrs. Walton, Roy Fenwick, Elizabeth Kilko and Kathy Kilko attended a wedding and anniversary in Sandusky. Mr. Boker showed old pictures at the PTA meeting. Junior and Senior class talked about their class trip to New York and the World’s Fair. Kellstone added a 26-28 ton bulldozer to their equipment and hired Jim Kekelik, Bob Erne and Jim McAfee. Drilling and blasting going on daily. Henry Beatty and Carl Seeholzer work for the state to get campground ready. John Hughes died, was oldest living person on the island and is remembered. Daughter is Mrs. Oscar McKillips and son is Clayton Hughes. James McGlinchey (son-in-law of August Mahr) had to land his plane without a landing gear. Burt Miller granted permission to erect a miniature golf course downtown. History of the Quarry continues and there are 9 photos with descriptions along with 2 maps.